Category Archives: Whitfield

KEMP: Call For Special Election For State Representative, Districts 4 and 60

Notice is hereby given that a special election shall be held on November 7, 2017 in the parts of Whitfield County that comprise Georgia House of Representatives District 4 to fill the seat for the unexpired term of Rep. Bruce Broadrick. A runoff election, if needed, shall be held on December 5, 2017.

Notice is also hereby given that a special election shall be held on November 7, 2017 in the parts of Clayton and Fulton Counties that comprise Georgia State of Representatives District 60 to fill the seat for the unexpired term of Rep. Keisha Waites. A runoff election, if needed, shall be held on December 5, 2017.

Qualifying for the special election shall be held in the Elections Division of the Office of Secretary of State, 2 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive SE, 802 West Tower, Atlanta, Georgia 30334. The dates and hours of qualifying will be Monday, September 25, 2017 beginning at 9:00 a.m. and ending at 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, September 26, 2017 beginning at 9:00 a.m. and ending at 5:00 p.m., and Wednesday, September 27, 2017 beginning at 9:00 a.m. and ending at 1:00 p.m. The qualifying fee shall be $400.00.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017 is the last day to register to vote for all persons who are not registered to vote and who desire to vote in the special election. Advance in-person absentee voting will begin on Monday, October 16, 2017.

Twelve North Georgians Receive Post-Exposure Rabies Treatment

Dalton (GA) – North Georgia Health District officials announced today that twelve people are currently receiving post-exposure rabies treatment due to contact with domestic animals that have now tested positive for the disease.

Within the past two weeks, two puppies and a kitten have been confirmed by the Georgia Public Health Laboratory as having rabies. All three pets were too young to receive rabies vaccinations. One of the puppies was in Whitfield County and the other was in Gilmer County. The kitten was in Cherokee County. In each case, the pet was attacked by a rabid wild animal and bitten in the head, but it was not reported to veterinarians or health authorities until rabies symptoms developed in the pet.

The time between being bitten by the wild animal and onset of rabies symptoms was very short because the head bites were close to the brain. The rabies virus only travels through the nervous system to the brain, not through blood or other organs. The closer a bite is from the brain, the shorter time it takes to reach the brain.

Wild animals that transmitted rabies to the puppies and kitten were a skunk, a raccoon and, possibly, a coyote.

The fact that these unrelated cases occurred in separate areas of the North Georgia Health District within the past two weeks is a coincidence, and even more coincidental is that all pets involved were too young to vaccinate. Pets must be at least three months old to be vaccinated against rabies.

Parents are strongly cautioned to keep children away from wild animals, strays and unvaccinated pets that may have been in contact with wild animals. Vaccinate all dogs and cats at three months of age and no later.

Wild carnivores are the animals most likely to spread rabies to pets and humans, including raccoons, skunks, foxes, bobcats, and coyotes. It is also not uncommon for persons to acquire rabies from bats. Any bite or other physical contact with a bat or any of these wild carnivores should be evaluated by a medical professional for rabies exposure. Even finding a bat in a bedroom where a person has been sleeping is cause for alarm and should be reported. Human deaths from rabies in the United States are rare, but because rabies is almost always fatal once symptoms begin to develop in a human, the only prevention is anti-rabies treatments given as soon as possible after exposure to rabies. If given in time, the treatments are 100 percent effective in preventing rabies. Only a small minority of wild animals carry and transmit rabies, so indiscriminate killing of them is not warranted. If these types of wild animals or domestic animals seem to be behaving strangely or displaying symptoms suggestive of a neurological illness, contact a veterinarian and the county Environmental Health office at once.

Livestock animals are also susceptible to rabies but can be vaccinated by a veterinarian. Rabies vaccinations are strongly recommended for show livestock and any livestock with which humans have regular contact such as riding horses.

Contact the local Environmental Health Office for questions about rabies or to report an incident that may involve rabies. Contact information for Environmental Health offices in the North Georgia Health District is available at www.nghd.org. Questions and reports may also be directed to the North Georgia Health District Environmental Health office in Dalton, Georgia by calling (706) 529-5757, extension 1161.

Find additional information on CDC’s website at https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/index.html.

Deal Announces Innovation Fund Grant Award Winners

Gov. Nathan Deal today announced 18 grant award winners for the Innovation Fund, a competitive grant program that provides funding to local education authorities and schools to further advance student achievement in Georgia.

“The Innovation Fund Grant is an opportunity to fuel the innovative ideas of Georgia’s education leaders and students throughout the state,” said Deal. “I am confident this funding will give schools and education groups a greater opportunity to develop methods to ensure that every Georgia student is given the tools necessary for academic achievement.”

The programs are aligned with the following priority areas: applied learning with a focus on science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM) education; development and replication of blended learning school models; birth to age eight language and literacy development; and teacher and leader development for high-need schools.

Grantees will evaluate the effectiveness of their programs and submit their findings to the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement. The state will use these findings to determine best practices in each of the priority areas.

The grant award winners and their respective programs are listed below:

Planning Grants

Planning grants will provide each winner between $5,000 to $10,000 over one year to research and develop an innovative education program aligned with one of the Innovation Fund priority areas.

Baldwin County School District
Read Baldwin County

Clarke County School District
Coaching for Innovation in P-3 Language & Literacy

Charles R. Drew Charter School
21CLM: Promoting School Innovation and Success throughout Georgia

Elm Street Elementary
STEAM in 3D- Dream, Design, DO!

Greenwood Learning Center/Rome Transitional Academy
Building STEAM

Houston County Schools
Read to Lead

Liberty Tech
Every Student, Every Day: Applied Service Learning

North Heights Elementary
Growing Up Green

Screven County Elementary School
School and Family Ties

Tattnall County Board of Education
Lead-Read-Succeed: Developing Teachers and Leaders to Achieve Student Literacy Mastery

Telfair County Schools
Tiny Trojans Early Literacy Program

West End Elementary
SusTEAMability: Sustaining Pollinators

 Implementation Grants

Implementation grants will provide each winner between $600,000 and $700,000 over two years to pilot an innovative education program aligned with one of the Innovation Fund priority areas.

 Cobb County School District
KickStART Cobb: Using the Power of Arts Integration to Fuel Early Language and Literacy Development

Whitfield County Schools
Beyond the Classroom 

Scaling Grants

Scaling grants will provide each winner between $250,000 and $700,000 over two years to scale a successful existing program to serve more students, teachers or leaders.

Atlanta Neighborhood Charter School
CREATE (Collaboration and Reflection to Enhance Atlanta Teacher Effectiveness)

Carroll County School System
Full STEAM Ahead

Gwinnett County Public Schools
Gear-Up for Graduation!

Thomas County School System
Scaling of Blended Learning to Thomas County Central High School

Descriptions of the winning proposals are here.  (PDF)

About the Innovation Fund

The Innovation Fund invests in public education entities that aggressively develop and scale programs that enable Georgia educators to improve student performance and tackle our state’s most significant education challenges.  In 2011, The Innovation Fund began as a $19.4 million competitive grant competition created under Georgia’s Race to the Top (RT3) Plan. To continue the Innovation Fund’s work beyond RT3, Governor Deal appropriated state funding for Fiscal Years (FY) 2015, 2016, and 2017. Since its inception, the Innovation Fund has invested $32 million of state and federal funding through 84 grants to 55 school districts, charter schools, postsecondary institutions and nonprofit organizations to pilot innovative education programs, ranging in focus from teacher and leader induction and development to STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) applied learning, blended learning, and birth to age eight language and literacy development.  More information about the Innovation Fund can be found on the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement website.